Book Review: The Aviator’s Wife & The Fault in our Stars

One of my resolutions for 2014 was to read one book per month. I wanted this to be a book for me…not a parenting book, not a magazine, but a whole book. So far we’re two months into the year and I have held up to this resolution (Woohoo!).

I am so glad that I read both of these books. 

 Book Cover from Randomhouse.com

Book Cover from Randomhouse.com

I have to be honest. Before reading this novel, I knew that Anne Morrow Lindbergh was married to Charles Lindbergh. That was the extent of my knowledge of her. Reading this novel was like listening to the stories in a history book come alive. The author writes in such a way that the reader feels everything: the anticipation of each time Anne goes up in the plane, the nervousness when Anne and Charles meet, the utter sadness when their first son is kidnapped and later found dead, and the apathy between them as they grow apart later in life.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh was a pilot in her own right. Sure, she married the most famous pilot that ever lived. But, Anne had a story to tell just as her husband did. This novel is her story. It is chock full of historical facts, but for me, it was also a story of a woman trying to find her place in the world. Anne was a well-educated woman who learned to fly planes, birthed six children, lived in the public eye during war-time, and wrote many books.

As a young reader, I loved historical fiction, especially Ann Rinaldi’s novels. Of late, I haven’t been drawn to this genre for no particular reason. However, after reading The Aviator’s Wife, I’m definitely hooked again! I would recommend this novel to any reader who is looking to get a glimpse into the life of a strong, accomplished woman, one who the public knew and loved before she loved herself. 


 Book Cover from wikipedia.org

Book Cover from wikipedia.org

Hazel and Augustus (Gus) become the best of friends and even reach boyfriend/girlfriend status. Gus is trying to make his mark on the world while Hazel is satisfied with simply living her life. Cancer is their common denominator.

The Fault in our Stars is a fictional story of two young people who are navigating life with cancer. They meet at a support group meeting and become instant friends. John Green did such a beautiful job of portraying these two main characters in his writing. Just a few chapters into the book, I felt like Hazel and Gus were family friends who I grew up with. The characters were likable, yet very real in dealing with the cards they were dealt. I definitely spent a few of C's nap times reading this book and ugly crying by myself.

This book falls into the Teen & Young Adult book category, but I would recommend this book to any teenage or adult audience. This book is a good reminder that life is to be lived with ones you love and to embrace each day.

 Photo from Fanpop.com

Photo from Fanpop.com